The Marine Who Has Bawney Fwank Scared

In a district where Scott Brown won, Sean Bielat mounts a sewious chawwenge.

Okay enough poking fun at Bawney, err...I mean Barney.  James Taranto of the Wall Street Journal wrote a piece on Sean Bielat, Mr. Franks challenger to the Congressional seat in Frank's district in Massachusetts.

'I don't consider myself a tea party candidate," Sean Bielat tells me over dinner. "I don't know what it means." But an hour later Mr. Bielat, Rep. Barney Frank's Republican challenger, receives a hero's welcome at the Spindle City Tea Party, a gathering of nearly 200 citizen- activists in this economically depressed mill town. As he approaches the stage, they stand, applauding and chanting "Go, Sean, go!"



What he tells them is consistent with this reporter's view of the tea party: "I'm starting to think that people want to take this country back—that people no longer believe that the government has the answers for our betterment, that the government can tell them how they should use their money. People believe that they have the power to create their own opportunity, if only they are given the chance. . . . There is so much wrong in Washington, I almost don't know where to start."
No matter where you live in the country, you would do well to check out Sean's campaign if you would like to see Barney Frank gone.  Don't forget that many people across the nation donated to Scott brown's campaign, not just the people of the district in Massachusetts that he ran in.  You can make a difference even if you don't live in Frank's district or in Massachusetts at all.

There are plenty of ways to help, donations of money, donations of your time or talents, word of mouth, encourage people to vote, give them rides if needed.  Blog, Tweet, Facebook, and social network the heck out of the campaign, put signs in your yard, or bumper stickers on your car.  Write to the editors of your newspaper if you are in Frank's district, many small local papers will accept articles from citizens on such subjects.

If you want to see change from the same old, same old, then dump Barney and elect Sean by doing whatever you can to help.  Remember one thing that Barack Obama did not, change starts with YOU, the ordinary every day citizen. You have the power and as you have seen in many of the primaries throughout the nation, it is not necessarily the incumbent or the candidate with the most money that wins !

Sean Bielat for Congress

ByeByeBarney.org

Democrats Think Tea Party's Racist; GOP, Unaffiliateds Disagree

Democrats Think Tea Party's Racist; GOP, Unaffiliateds Disagree

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that among all Likely Voters 31% believe most members of the Tea Party are racist. Nearly half (48%), however, say most Tea Party members are not racist. Another 22% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

But 56% of Democratic voters say most members of the small government, anti-tax movement are racially biased. Seventy percent (70%) of Republicans and 55% of unaffiliated voters reject that assertion and say most Tea Party members are not racist.

Rory Reid: ObamaCare Could Hurt Nevada

Rory Reid: Healthcare reform could end up hurting Nevada - The Hill's Healthwatch

During a televised debate, Rory Reid, the son of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), said he does not support the legal challenges against the health overhaul. Yet, he does believe that President Obama’s signature achievement could negatively affect Nevada.

“I don’t deny, however,” Rory Reid said, “that Nevada needs to be vigilant on this issue. The law that was passed gives time for the new system to go into effect, but there is potential for it to put significant pressure on states because Medicaid rates could go up significantly.”



Jay Are's Take: Obviously Rory's statement means that ObamaCare could have a negative affect on ALL states !

'GALLUP.... UNEMPLOYMENT AT 10.1% !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!'

Friday's Unemployment Rate Report Likely to Understate

The government's final unemployment report before the midterm elections is based on job market conditions around mid-September. Gallup's modeling of the unemployment rate is consistent with Tuesday's ADP report of a decline of 39,000 private-sector jobs, and indicates that the government's national unemployment rate in September will be in the 9.6% to 9.8% range. This is based on Gallup's mid-September measurements and the continuing decline Gallup is seeing in the U.S. workforce during 2010.

However, Gallup's monitoring of job market conditions suggests that there was a sharp increase in the unemployment rate during the last couple of weeks of September. It could be that the anticipated slowdown of the overall economy has potential employers even more cautious about hiring. Some of the increase could also be seasonal or temporary.

Further, Gallup's underemployment measure suggests that the percentage of workers employed part time but looking for full-time work is declining as the unemployment rate increases. To some degree, this may reflect a reduced company demand for new part-time employees. For example, employers may be converting some existing part-time workers to full time when they are needed as replacements, but may not in turn be hiring replacement part-time workers. Another explanation may relate to the shrinkage of the workforce, as some employees who have taken part-time work in hopes of getting full-time jobs get discouraged and drop out of the workforce completely -- going back to school to enhance their education, for example, instead of doing part-time work. It is even possible that some workers may find unemployment insurance a better alternative than part-time work with little prospect of going full time.

Regardless, the sharp increase in the unemployment rate CLICK HERE

POLITICO: Michigan judge upholds health care law - Ben Smith - Michigan judge upholds health care law

POLITICO: Michigan judge upholds health care law - Ben Smith - Michigan judge upholds health care law

A federal judge in Michigan just now upheld this year's health care legislation in the first significant challenge to its constitutionality.

Ruling against a lawsuit brought by the conservative Thomas More Law Center, Judge George Steeh, a Clinton appointee to the Eastern District of Michigan, found that the Commerce Clause applies to health care, and that penalties imposed on people who don't buy insurance aren't an unconstitutional "direct tax."

POLL: Independents prefer divided government and are leaning Republican - TheHill.com

POLL: Independents prefer divided government and are leaning Republican - TheHill.com

POLL: Opinions of Obama will be on voters minds when they decide on Nov. 2 - TheHill.com

POLL: Opinions of Obama will be on voters minds when they decide on Nov. 2 - TheHill.com

District by district — 12 freshman Democrats in danger - TheHill.com

District by district — 12 freshman Democrats in danger - TheHill.com

POLL: Dislike of healthcare law crosses party lines, 1 in 4 Dems want repeal - TheHill.com

POLL: Dislike of healthcare law crosses party lines, 1 in 4 Dems want repeal - TheHill.com

POLL: GOP leads widely, Dems in danger but race for House tight - TheHill.com

POLL: GOP leads widely, Dems in danger but race for House tight - TheHill.com

AP-GfK Poll: Working-class whites shun Democrats

An Associated Press-GfK poll shows whites without four-year college degrees preferring GOP candidates by twice the margin of the last two elections, when Democrats made significant gains in the House and Senate. The poll, conducted last month, found this group favoring GOP hopefuls 58 percent to 36 percent — a whopping 22 percentage-point gap.

GOP Well Positioned Among Likely Midterm Voters

GOP Well Positioned Among Likely Midterm Voters

Gallup's generic ballot for Congress among registered voters currently shows Republicans with 46% of the vote and Democrats with 43%, similar to the 46% to 46% tie reported a week ago. However, in Gallup's first estimates among likely voters, based on polling from Sept. 23-Oct. 3, Republicans have a double-digit advantage under two separate turnout scenarios.


Here's what Gallup found:

Registered Voters: Dems 43% Reps 46%

Likely Voters-High Turnout: Dems 40% Reps 53%

Likely Voters-Low Turnout: Dems 38% Reps 56%